TEMC “Organ Tweet” for Rededication Sunday Nov. 16

TEMC Exterior detail small

The Carillon Tower, Timothy Eaton Memorial Church

MUSIC OF REDEDICATION
When an organ, a church building, a communion chalice, prayer shawl or any other inanimate object is said to be somehow ‘dedicated’ to God’s service it is actually not so much about “the thing” – it is really about us. In committing a century of vision, investment, artistry, careful management and thoughtful reflection to its organ, our church has not just honoured a legacy or maintained an asset – it has sought God’s will for how our faith might be proclaimed in our time and place, and found a way both for us, and the world around us.

It might be easy for the music of the TEMC Organ Rededication Service at 11:00 today to be overshadowed by the glories of the festive concert planned for later that afternoon – so here, to avoid the risk, is perhaps the true heart of our Sunday celebrations.  The service is broadcast live on CHIN Radio AM 1540 in Toronto, live-streamed on the Internet and podcast for download anytime at www.temc.ca (follow the Listen and Learn link, and either ‘Listen Live’ or ‘Find a Sermon’ searching for Sunday November 16.

BIG HYMNS: “Praise to the Lord, the Almighty”, “Now thank we all our God”, “O God beyond all praising”, and in the postlude “A mighty fortress is our God” – all voicing one of the highest tenets of the Christian faith, gratitude.

A LITURGY OF REDEDICATION that culminates in an improvised “Organ Praise” response in music.

A “CHOIR ANTHEM” BY THE ORGAN: In keeping with TEMC’s eclectic and outreaching musical tradition I’m offering two consecutive movements from Edward Elgar’s “Enigma” Variations, and most especially “Nimrod” – Elgar’s beloved testament to his closest friend and to a conversation they had about the slow movements of Beethoven Symphonies.

A POSTLUDE CELEBRATING THE REFORMATION: the Roman Catholic Church is the unquestioned founder and initial sponsor of the organ’s unique place in Christian worship to this day – but it was the Reformation that made it what it is throughout Christianity today – the main enabler of congregational singing looking both backward and forward in time.

PRAISE TO GOD for holy work in our midst, including music. Amen. Alleluia!

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