Genre Implosion – 10th Anniversary episode publication

20141002114209Things have been pretty quiet at IAM this past year since the conclusion of my service to the Organ Century year of Timothy Eaton Memorial Church in Toronto, whose employ I left in July 2015 after my exciting and deeply satisfying two year opportunity to serve with its excellent staff and congregation, and to contribute to a milestone in the life of both instrument and institution.

The big news for Easter 2016 is that I am finally getting back into both blogging and podcasting about music.  And to mark almost exactly its 10-year anniversary I have published the entire 19-episode archive of “Genre Implosion”, the radio show on CFMU FM 94.4 that formed a part of my 2004-2006 M.A. degree in Music Criticism.  You can access the entire series now on the “Listen IAM” link of ideasaboutmusic.ca, but beginning in April 2016 I will publish a new weekly Wednesday blog post devoted to each episode – this exercise will continue from Wednesday April 6th until mid-August.  I will be removing the GI archive at the end of August 2016 – some copyright material was really only covered by the CFMU station license for our weekly broadcast, and was not designed to be a podcast.

Enjoy Genre Implosion for now – I am still proud of much of it, although it’s always hard to look more than a few years back at one’s creative work without thinking of high school yearbooks and other artifacts of the past!

I still say, as I did at the start of every episode – they’re your ears – BELIEVE them!

-CD

 

 

Genre Implosion revisited – Episode 3, “Rhythm” 23 Nov 2005

Genre Implosion Revisit, Episode III – RHYTHM

GI rhythm episodeGI was the name of a graduate research project I completed as part of the requirements for my M.A in Music Criticism, in the always unique and unfortunately now-defunct program founded by Allan Walker at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and offered from 1981 to 2007. The project, which consisted of a major research paper, a 21-episode weekly radio show and a survey that sought to understand how we classify music into genres and how we are in turn influenced by that system of classification is chronicled on an area of my own main website… genreimplosion.orgalt.com.

IAM is hosting my re-visit, and perhaps your first visit, to this project as it aired Wednesday mornings from November 2005 to April 2006 on CFMU, the student radio station at McMaster University that kindly agreed to support my work. I’ll say only briefly that every 30-minute episode chose a simple musical premise that could be applied broadly across genre lines, and offered selections drawing attention to how this premise appeared in widely divergent styles.

Episode III, in classic GI “not even scratching the surface” tradition, dealt with rhythm.

 

Wed 23 November 2005 – SHOW III: RHYTHM

Central to a piece of music’s life, rhythm is both a founding principle, a pervasive pattern of structure and a flexible parameter at the disposal of musicians and composers to make musical points, imbue energy, and finesse the mental connection between a piece and the body of the listener.

J.S. BACH: Prelude, BWV 846 from ‘Das Wohltemperierte Klavier’ (2:07)
(Ton Koopman, harpsichord)

AASHID HIMONS: Little Red Rooster (5:09)
(The Mountain Soul Band, from ‘West Virginia Hills’)

CHRISTÒBAL MORALES (c1500-1553): Sanctus (4:44)
(Hilliard Ensemble, Jan Garbarek, Saxophone)

DAN LOCKLAIR: Caput Serpentis from ‘Constellations’ (1:15)
(George Ritchie, organ; Albert Rometo, percussion)

FATALA (Guinean drumming ensemble: Yoky (2:03)

MAURiCE RAVEL: Daphnis et Chloe: Opening to Scene I (excerpt 2:30)
(Orchestre Symphonique de Montreal / Charles Dutoit)
JOHN STAFFORD SMITH: Star Spangled Banner (excerpt 4:50)
(Jimmi Hendrix, recorded live at Woodstock)
—– Music 22:08

Genre Implosion revisited Episode 2 (endings) – 16 Nov 2005

Genre Implosion Revisit, Episode II – ENDINGS

musicGI was the name of a graduate research project I completed as part of the requirements for my M.A in Music Criticism, in the always unique and unfortunately now-defunct program founded by Allan Walker at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and offered from 1981 to 2007. The project, which consisted of a major research paper, a 21-episode weekly radio show and a survey that sought to understand how we classify music into genres and how we are in turn influenced by that system of classification is chronicled on an area of my own main website… genreimplosion.orgalt.com.

IAM is hosting my re-visit, and perhaps your first visit, to this project as it aired Wednesday mornings from November 2005 to April 2006 on CFMU, the student radio station at McMaster University that kindly agreed to support my work. I’ll say only briefly that every 30-minute episode chose a simple musical premise that could be applied broadly across genre lines, and offered selections drawing attention to how this premise appeared in widely divergent styles.

Episode II, in answer to Episode I’s “Introductions”, dealt with musical endings.

Endings have presented challenges to composers and performers, who frequently resort to formulae and clichés – even non-endings like the ubiquitous fade of pop music just to ‘make it stop.’ Yet, scanning history, we see just as many examples that echo their beginnings and even make radical departures in their closing seconds.

MICHAEL BUBLE: Fever (3:52)
JOSSY ABRAMOVITCH: Turkish Circus (4:41) (Quartetto Gelato)
SAMUEL HONG/ANNA GUO: Autumn Moon on a Calm Lake (4:50) (Toronto Dunhuang Chamber Ensemble)
CLAIRE LYNCH: Children of Abraham (2:56)
MYCHAEL and JEFF DANNA: The Blood of Cu Chulainn (4:07)
BUCK 65: Wicked and Weird (3:12)
—– Music 20:26

Genre Implosion revisited Episode 1, “Introductions” – 9 Nov 2005

Genre Implosion Episode 1

f_gholipour20130223113425497GI was the name of a graduate research project I completed as part of the requirements for my M.A in Music Criticism, in the always unique and unfortunately now-defunct program founded by Allan Walker at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, and offered from 1981 to 2007.  The project, which consisted of a major research paper, a 20-episode weekly radio show and a survey that sought to understand how we classify music into genres and how we are in turn influenced by that system of classification is chronicled on a website that used to reside at http://www.genreimplosion.ca, but has since moved to a more gentrified retirement address on my main website… genreimplosion.orgalt.com.

IAM now begins my re-visit, and perhaps your first visit, to this project as it aired Wednesday mornings from November 2005 to April 2006 on CFMU, the student radio station at McMaster University, that kindly agreed to support my work. I’ll say only briefly that every 30-minute episode chose a simple musical premise that could be applied broadly across genre lines, and offered selections drawing attention to how this premise appeared in widely divergent styles.  The first episode, appropriately, dealt with musical introductions.

Wed 9 November 2005 – SHOW I: INTRODUCTIONS

Introductions often sound very different than the main body of a piece, and yet they’ve been crucial to attracting listeners into pieces of music since long before the sound byte made us just tend to change the channel. Throughout history they have tended to privilege this role, rather than immediately revealing the piece’s main content.

trad. arr RAWLINS CROSS: MacPherson’s Lament (3:59) (from ‘Celtic Instrumentals’)
MIKE EVIN: Stay Gritty – 3:30 (from ‘I’ll bring the Stereo’)
FELIX MENDELSSOHN-BARTHOLDY: Grave-Allegro from String Symphony #2, op.36 (5:16) (Gewaundhaus Orchester Leipzig/Kurt Masur)
RICHARD & ROBERT SHERMAN/HOLLY COLE (Trust in me) (the Holly Cole Collection, Vol.1)
BUGGLES: Video killed the radio star (4:09)
—– Music 21:54